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UK [prəˈfaʊnd] / US adjective
Word forms "profound":
adjective profound comparative profounder superlative profoundest
1)
a) very great

a profound change in the climate of the Earth

The difference between the beginners and the intermediate class was profound.

This is a scientific discovery of profound significance.

a profound effect/influence/impact:

My grandfather's death had a profound effect on my father.

b) used about very strong feelings, especially negative ones

Most of the divorced parents we interviewed said they had experienced guilt and a profound sense of failure.

2)
a) showing serious thought and wise ideas

Kafka's profound insights into human experience

b) needing serious thought or study

profound questions

3) very severe

profound deafness

4) literary deep

Derived word:
profoundly
adverb

She was profoundly influenced by Schulz.


English dictionary. 2014.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Profound — Pro*found , a. [F. profond, L. profundus; pro before, forward + fundus the bottom. See {Found} to establish, {Bottom} lowest part.] 1. Descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to a great depth; deep. A gulf profound. Milton. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • profound — [prō found′, prəfound′] adj. [ME < OFr profund < L profundus < pro , forward (see PRO 2) + fundus, BOTTOM] 1. very deep or low [a profound abyss, sleep, etc.] 2. marked by intellectual depth [a profound discussion] 3. i …   English World dictionary

  • profound — [adj1] intellectual, thoughtful abstruse, acroamatic, deep, difficult, discerning, enlightened, erudite, esoteric, heavy*, hermetic, informed, intellectual, intelligent, knowing, knowledgeable, learned, mysterious, occult, Orphic, penetrating,… …   New thesaurus

  • Profound — Pro*found , n. 1. The deep; the sea; the ocean. [1913 Webster] God in the fathomless profound Hath all this choice commanders drowned. Sandys. [1913 Webster] 2. An abyss. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • profound — (adj.) c.1300, characterized by intellectual depth, from O.Fr. profund (late 12c.), from L. profundus deep, bottomless, vast, also obscure, profound, from pro forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + fundus bottom (see FUND (Cf. fund) (n.)). The literal and… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Profound — Pro*found , v. t. To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Profound — Pro*found , v. i. To dive deeply; to penetrate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • profound — I (esoteric) adjective abstruse, acroamatic, acroamatical, acroatic, astute, complicated, erudite, esoteric, gnostic, intellectual, intellectually deep, knowing, learned, oracular, penetrating, perceptive, philosophical, recondite, reflective,… …   Law dictionary

  • profound — *deep, abysmal Analogous words: penetrating, probing, piercing (see ENTER): scrutinizing, inspecting, examining (see SCRUTINIZE) Antonyms: shallow …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • profound — ► ADJECTIVE (profounder, profoundest) 1) very great or intense. 2) showing great knowledge or insight. 3) demanding deep study or thought. 4) archaic very deep. DERIVATIVES profoundly adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • profound — 01. The death of her father at an early age had a [profound] effect on Baptista. 02. There is a [profound] difference in thinking between the two leaders, which makes reaching an agreement extremely difficult. 03. People were [profoundly] shocked …   Grammatical examples in English

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